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  • Manufacturer: Rolex
    Year: 1999
    Reference No: 16520
    Movement No: 164'235
    Case No: U'917'462
    Model Name: Cosmograph Daytona "Patrick Heiniger"
    Material: Stainless steel
    Calibre: Automatic, cal. 4030, 31 jewels
    Bracelet/Strap: Stainless steel Rolex Oyster, stamped 78390, end links stamped 503 B, max length 205mm.
    Clasp/Buckle: Stainless steel Rolex folding deployant clasp
    Dimensions: 39mm. Diameter
    Signed: Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed
    Accessories: Accompanied by Rolex fitted box, punched guarantee dated 22 January, 1999 issued in the name of Patrick Heiniger, product literature and service papers from Julian Joailliers dated 20 June, 2017.

  • Catalogue Essay

    Even though Rolex was famously known for its automatic “perpetual” movements, its chronograph models always housed a manual wind movement. This changed when for the Daytona’s 25th anniversary in 1988, Rolex introduced the first self-winding chronograph model in its history. The newly launched reference 16520 in a larger 39mm case was powered by a derivative of Zenith’s El Primero calibre, substantially modified by Rolex. It was an immediate success, resulting in unprecedented demand that would require clients to have to wait as long as seven years to purchase one.
    Without a doubt, the 16520 elevated the Daytona to its current mythical status. The present model is however not a “normal” Daytona reference 16520 as it belonged to Patrick Heiniger under whose leadership this watch was developed.

    Patrick Heiniger, born in Argentina in 1950, became CEO of the famed brand in 1992, its only 3rd CEO since its inception in 1905 following the footsteps of founder Hans Wilsdorf and his own father André Heiniger.

    Sometimes it seems that one cannot escape one’s fate and even though Patrick Heiniger had studied law and set up his own firm in Geneva he joined Rolex in 1986 as sales director becoming CEO in 1992, a position he held until 2008.

    Rolex as we know it today is the result of Patrick Heiniger’s vista and strategy. Desiring full production autonomy Heiniger went on a buying spree where Rolex started purchasing its core suppliers may they be movement, case or bracelet makers.

    André, Patrick’s father once said “Rolex is not in the watch business, we are in the luxury business”. Using his father’s words as a starting point, Patrick devised a full-fledged strategy to make Rolex the luxury powerhouse we know today. It is also under his management that Rolex fully repositioned itself as a patron of sporting events and the arts.
    Patrick Heiniger passed away in Monte-Carlo in 2013.

    Please note that this watch was given by Mr Patrick Heiniger to a friend shortly after he acquired it.

  • Artist Biography

    Rolex

    Swiss • 1905

    Founded in 1905 England by Hans Wilsdorf and Alfred Davis as Wilsdorf & Davis, it soon became known as the Rolex Watch Company in 1915, moving its headquarters to Geneva in 1919. Like no other company, the success of the wristwatch can be attributed to many of Rolex's innovations that made them one of the most respected and well-known of all luxury brands. These innovations include their famous "Oyster" case — the world's first water resistant and dustproof watch case, invented in 1926 — and their "Perpetual" — the first reliable self-winding movement for wristwatches launched in 1933. They would form the foundation for Rolex's Datejust and Day-Date, respectively introduced in 1945 and 1956, but also importantly for their sports watches, such as the Explorer, Submariner and GMT-Master launched in the mid-1950s.

    One of its most famous models is the Cosmograph Daytona. Launched in 1963, these chronographs are without any doubt amongst the most iconic and coveted of all collectible wristwatches. Other key collectible models include their most complicated vintage watches, including references 8171 and 6062 with triple calendar and moon phase, "Jean Claude Killy" triple date chronograph models and the Submariner, including early "big-crown" models and military-issued variants.

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Ref. 16520
A rare and most interesting stainless steel chronograph wristwatch with black dial, bracelet, certificate and box

1999
39mm. Diameter
Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed

Estimate
CHF20,000 - 40,000 
€17,300-34,500
$20,700-41,300

Sold for CHF35,000

Contact Specialist
Alexandre Ghotbi
+41 22 317 81 89
[email protected]

The Geneva Watch Auction: SIX

Geneva Auctions 11 - 12 November 2017