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  • Literature

    Guillemin Chantal pp. 115-121

  • Catalogue Essay

    Including:
    #1 (the artist's wife, Phyllis); #2 (the artist's living room in Berkeley); #3 (seated woman with part of a table near her right leg); #4 (Phyllis); #5 (Phyllis wearing a hat); #6 (two portraits of Phyllis); #7 (Phyllis and her friend, Flora); #8 (double portrait of Phyllis with motif taken from a rug in the artist's living room and used as the insignia for the cover of the book); #9 (the artist drew on the plate during a model session with several artist friends); #10 (similar to the unique impression, Composition With Leafy Plant in Vase With Fork and drawn at the same time); #11 (opened letter on a table); #12 (Phyllis on outside deck); #13 (artist's daughter, Gretchen); #14 (Phyllis on the patio, 6-16-65 in drypoint on the plate); #15 (standing nude with arms on hips); #16 (the artist drew on the plate during a model session with several artist friends); #17 (back view of standing nude woman with partial reflection); #18 (Phyllis in striped chair); #19 (still life with pencil, glass and box with cigarettes); #20 (painting in artist's studio lying on its side behind a small table); #21 (portrait of Phyllis); #22 (portrait of Phyllis); #23 (portrait of Phyllis); #24 (Phyllis seated in rattan chair); #25 (Phyllis leaning head on arm of couch); #26 (table still life with ashtray and numbers); #27 (still life with silverware, scissors and three crosses); #28 (sketch of Kathan Brown done at Crown Point studio); #29 (woman seated in curved-back chair resting elbows on knees); #30 (Phyllis at home); #31 (looking out at deck of Diebenkorn residence); #32 (streetscene -trees, houses, lawns); #33 (hillside streets); #34 (nude drawn during model session); #35 (reclining nude woman with arm over her head); #36 (table setting with flowery tablecloth); #37 (crosshatched drawing of woman in chair, turning her back); #38 (chair, potted plant, woman standing); #39 (interior of artist's studio on Adeline Street in Berkeley); #40 (Phyllis); and #41 (still life with plate and open scissors)

    One of the most remarkable adaptations of painterly sensibility to intaglio processes occurred in the work of Richard Diebenkorn. It is typical of Diebenkorn’s wayward timing that at the height of the American lithographic revival he chose to begin working intensively in etchings, just as, at the apex of the critical success of Abstract Expressionism, he returned to the depiction of landscape and the human figure. 41 Etchings Drypoints (1965) is a collection of small, black-and-white interior scenes, seated women, table-top still lifes, and cityscapes. The mood of quiet observation bordering on melancholy is invoked partly by the nature of the subjects, partly by the sense of time passing that is imbued by the prints’ rhythmic sequence, and partly by the etching medium itself. While lithography may capture the nuance of the brush, etching is better at revealing the architecture of the image, the linear tautness that underlies all Diebenkorn’s art and makes his moves between figuration and abstractions seem almost superficial. 41 Etchings Drypoints was the first publication of Crown Point Press. Susan Tallman The Contemporary Print: I Painters and Printers, Thames and Hudson, 1996, pp. 24-25.

  • Artist Biography

    Richard Diebenkorn

    Wholly devoted to painting, Richard Diebenkorn created artworks that often hovered between abstraction and figuration and were committed to exploring the inadequacies of the artform as well as celebrating its triumphs. Diebenkorn pioneered a quintessentially Californian style of abstraction lauded for its lyrical geometry and originally conceived during an epiphanic experience viewing the landscape from an aerial perspective: these paintings are neither fully representational nor abstract, but can be viewed as exploring the interstices between the two concepts and articulating the material experience of life in California. Although these works cemented the artist’s status as one of the premier painters of the postwar era, Diebenkorn oscillated between figuration and abstraction for the entirety of his career, achieving great successes with each new series; he is considered one of the founding members of the Bay Area Figurative Movement and his renowned Ocean Park paintings are considered chief accomplishments of postwar abstraction.

    Diebenkorn’s works betray the painstaking process of their creation. The laborious and contemplative nature of his practice shines through the richly rendered color and translucent striations of drawing, ethereal totems of the artist’s effort. Diebenkorn is considered an essential American abstractionist and his work is represented in many of the most important institutions in the country, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Fine Art Museums of San Francisco. 

     
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23

41 Etchings Drypoints

1963-5
The complete set of 41 etchings, on Rives BFK paper, with full margins, bound (as issued),
18 1/8 x 15 1/8 in. (46 x 38.4 cm)
all signed with initials, dated, annotated sequentially '#1-41' and numbered 9/25 in pencil (13 from the edition were bound, 12 loose, there were also 10 artist's proofs), published by Crown Point Press, San Francisco, all contained in original blue fabric-covered boards with double anchor insignia on the front and back by The Schuberth book bindery, San Francisco.

Estimate
$60,000 - 90,000 

Sold for $233,000

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Evening & Day Editions

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