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  • Provenance

    Industry Gallery, Washington D.C.
    Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2011

  • Literature

    Sophie Jones, "Touch of Wood," Art Review, March 2003, p. 120 for the "Slice" chair executed in plywood
    Anders Hammarstrand, Mathias Bengtsson, exh. cat., Röhsska Museet, Gothenburg, 2005, pp. 4-5, 18-19, pp. 20-21 for individual “slices”
    Sophie Lovell, Furnish: Furniture and Interior Design for the 21st Century, Berlin, 2007, for the "Slice" chair executed in plywood
    Robert Klanten, et al., Desire: The Shape of Things to Come, Berlin, 2008, p. 115, fig. 5
    Mathias Bengtsson, Alistair Robinson, Mathias Bengtsson, Manchester, 2009, pp. 4, 5, 6, 7, 47

  • Catalogue Essay

    “The Slice chair was constructed with the same adeptness an architect would employ to create a topological map of the landscape, evoking the illusion of a piece of furniture cut away from a cliff face and scaled to human proportions." BRADLEY QUINN, Scandinavian Style, 2003

    After studying furniture design in the early 1990s at the Danish College of Design and the Art Centre College in Switzerland, Mathias Bengtsson co-founded the design collective Panic, which helped to create new opportunities and support for young Danish designers. Bengtsson moved to London in 1996 to study design at the Royal College of Art under Ron Arad and eventually became a creator of the design collaborations At the Third Stroke and Design Laboratory. By 2002 Bengtsson had established his own studio after gaining international acclaim for his “Slice” series, exhibited widely throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. Mathias Bengtsson received the Finn Juhl Prize in 2012, awarded annually by the Wilhelm Hank foundation.

    Bengtsson defines himself as a designer, but his approach is that of a fine artist that treats furniture forms as subject matter despite their eventual and intended functionality. Attracted to both the limitations and opportunities of his field, he has explained that “furniture is just a platform or medium to present my ideas and a framework to ‘build’ from.” One of his best known designs, the “Slice” chair was produced in two series: in aluminum and plywood. As described by Bradley Quinn, “The Slice chair was constructed with the same adeptness an architect would employ to create a topological map of the landscape, evoking the illusion of a piece of furniture cut away from a cliff face and scaled to human proportions." (Scandinavian Style, 2003). An exploration in matter and time, the chair’s layered construction visually references mineral formations and its fluid profile stormy weather patterns. It evokes movement that occurs over millions of years or in a millisecond. This contrast is re-enforced by its construction in which the chair’s concept and materiality are defined equally by a human and a computer. The technological innovations that are a driving force behind Bengtsson’s designs are just one part of the traditional process he follows: beginning with a sketch, working up to a full-scale model, and then employing a computer to delineate each laser-cut layer for hand-assembly. He has said “The Slice series creates hand-made furniture using a computerized industrial process.” This combination intentionally echoes our own complicated relationship to the modern world, which is made larger by advances in technology but is ultimately reliant on human input.

    Examples of Bengtsson’s work are in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee Art Museum, Indianapolis Museum of Art, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

12

“Slice” chair

circa 1999
laser-cut aluminum
30 5/8 x 36 1/2 x 28 3/4 in. (77.8 x 92.7 x 73 cm)
The underside is computer-incised with facsimile signature/Mathias Bengtsson /Slice Chair/ A1 and top layer inscribed Mathias Bengtsson/11 / 20 in black ink. This work is number 11 from an edition of 20.

Estimate
$30,000 - 40,000 

Sold for $60,000

Contact Specialist
Amanda Stoffel
Head of Evening Sale, Contemporary Art
New York
+ 1 212 940 1261

Meaghan Roddy
Head of Sale, Design
New York
+ 1 212 940 1266

Contemporary Art and Design Evening Sale

New York Auction 3 March 2015 6pm