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  • Cheyenne Julien on her Work


    Jessica Ross: Definitely striking a chord, your figures possess serious pathos while aesthetically playing up what one critic coined as comic formalism. What is so fascinating about the human body, and how did you arrive at your signature style?


    Cheyenne Julien: I’ve been making figurative work for as long as I can remember. I think it’s because I love people. My favorite parts to paint are eyes and hands; I think they hold a lot of emotion. While I was in college, people constantly asked me why I paint the figure, a process that was actually discouraged for my first couple of years in school. I ignored the criticism and continued making the work. I guess things changed because now everybody makes figurative paintings. Seeing that switch is kind of funny to me. I think this “style” developed over a long time—like since childhood. I picked up my first Manga in the first grade and was instantly obsessed. A lot of the story took place within the image, which was perfect for someone who loved narratives but hated reading. Visual storytelling is obviously something that stuck with me. I think cartoons are great because they’re outside of our reality, but not really. They’re hyperreal in a way. Also, there’s more to come. I hope to continue to transform and develop my signature style.

     

    Jessica Ross, “Cheyenne Julien: Body and the Bronx”, Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine, online

    • Provenance

      Smart Objects, Los Angeles
      Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2017

Property from a Private Collection

10

Red Girl

signed and dated “Cheyenne Julien 2017” on the reverse
acrylic on canvas
12 x 9 in. (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
Painted in 2017.

Full Cataloguing

Estimate
$5,000 - 7,000 

Sold for $32,760

Contact Specialist

Patrizia Koenig
Associate Specialist, Head of New Now Sale
20th Century & Contemporary Art [email protected]

New Now

New York Auction 3 March 2021