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  • Provenance

    The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York
    Acquired from the above by the present owner

  • Exhibited

    Long Beach, University Art Museum, California State University, The Great American Pop Store: Multiples of the Sixties, August 26 - October 27, 1997, then traveled to Zimmerli Art Museum (November 22, 1997 - February 28, 1998), Baltimore Museum of Art (March 25 - May 31 1998), Montgomery Museum of Art (June 27 - August 23, 1998), Weisman Art Museum (September 18 - December 13, 1998), McNay Art Museum (January 18 - March 14, 1999) Josyln Museum of Art (October 23 - January 9, 2000), Lowe Art Museum (February 3 - March 26, 2000), Toldeo Museum of Art (June 4 - August 13, 2000) (another example exhibited)

  • Literature

    J. O'Connor and B. Liu, Unseen Warhol, Cologne: Taschen, 1996, p. 120 (another example illustrated)
    G. Frei and N. Printz, eds., The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings and Sculptures 1964-1969, vol. 2B, London: Phaidon, 2004, cat no. 1937.12, p. 287 (another example illustrated)
    D. Hickey, Andy Warhol "Giant" Size, London: Phaidon, 2006, p. 135 (another example illustrated)

  • Catalogue Essay

    “ You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you can know that the President drinks Cokes, Liz Taylor drinks Cokes, and just think, you can drink Coke, too.” - ANDY WARHOL


    Warhol’sfascination with the metalizing of everyday objects began in 1967 with a prizehe created for a contest sponsored by the Sunday Magazine of the New York-World
    Journal Tribune. The prize was a silvered bomb.The contest winner recalled visiting the Warhol Factory and beingdisheartened that his prize was not one of the iconic commercial objects.Warhol famously stated: “It’s so beautiful I couldn’t ruin it by paintinganything on it once I painted it silver. I’ve sat and stared at it for weeks.
    Isn’t it beautiful?” (G. Frei and N. Printz,TheAndy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné Vol. 2B: Paintings and Sculpture 1964-1969,Phaidon, 2002, p. 279).

    Warhol’s next collection of silver spraypainted objects, done in the same year as the bomb, were his Coca-Cola bottles,which made their visual premiere on the poster for the Museum of Merchandisefor an exhibition produced by The Fine Arts Committee of the Philadelphia YMHAand arranged by Joan Kron and Audrey Sabol. The poster advertised Warhol’sCoca-Cola bottles as being filled with toilet water and mischievously entitled“You’re in.” The outwardly shiny and slick bottles were, however, actually
    filled with “Silver Lining,” an inexpensive cologne. By suggesting that thisCoke bottle was filled with urine that had a cheap scent, Warhol seemed todefame the product that all Americas shared.Coca-Cola, however, was not amused and demanded that their productionand sale be halted. This work encapsulatesWarhol’s profound and unparalleled ability to both retain and destroy thecommercial identity of the everyday object.

  • Artist Biography

    Andy Warhol

    American • 1928 - 1987

    Known as the “King of Pop,” Andy Warhol was the leading face of the Pop Art movement in the United States in the 1960s. Following an early career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol achieved fame with his revolutionary series of silkscreened prints and paintings of familiar objects like Campbell's soup tins, and celebrities like Marilyn Monroe. Obsessed with popular culture, celebrity, and advertising, Warhol created his slick, seemingly mass-produced images of everyday subject matter from his famed Factory studio in New York City. His use of mechanical methods of reproduction, notably the commercial technique of silk screening, wholly revolutionized art-making.

    Working as an artist, but also director and producer, Warhol produced a number of avant-garde films in addition to managing the experimental rock band The Velvet Underground and founding Interview magazine. A central figure in the New York art scene until his untimely death in 1987, Warhol was notably a mentor to such artists as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

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185

You're In

1967
spray paint on Coca-Cola bottle
8 x 2 3/8 x 2 3/8 in. (20.3 x 6 x 6 cm.)
Numbered "SC22.009" on a label affixed to the underside.

Estimate
$60,000 - 80,000 

Sold for $56,250

Contact Specialist
Amanda Stoffel
Head of Day Sale
[email protected]
+1 212 940 1261

Contemporary Art Day Sale

New York 12 November 2013 11AM