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  • Provenance

    Laurent Delaye Gallery, London

  • Catalogue Essay

    In talking about his work, Perry signposts the distinction between his art, with its particular kind of mesmerising beauty, and the tradition of high art. He defines as sublime another sort of art that captures beauty with deft, minimal gestures, and is then quick to distance the work he executes from such subliminity. His pots are products of painstaking endeavour, each one coiled laboriously from snakes of clay, worked gradually into a reassuringly smooth, familiar shape, with an investment of enormous amounts of attention, time and effort. Perry chooses different tactics to catch and hold the viewers attention. His high-gloss glazes and the liberal use he makes of gold and lustre on his surfaces draw on traditional art's implied promise that its surface beauty will replay close scrutiny. From a distance, the seductive shimmering beauty of the work is immediate and irrefutable, with its evocations of precious oriental art objects, and apparent patina of age. That beauty seems to give the work an aura of authenticity, to offer a guarantee of gravitas. When the viewer does get up close, Perry rewards them with a breathtakingly rich level of detail which, in his words, "never lets them down".
    L. Jardine, Grayson Perry, Victoria Miro Gallery, London, 2004, n.p.

265

Saint Satin Satan

1999
Glazed Earthenware.
18 1/8 x 10 1/4 x 10 1/4 in. (46 x 26 x 26 cm).
Titled “Saint Satin Satan” on the face.

Estimate
£25,000 - 30,000 ≠ ♠ †

Sold for £50,400

Contemporary Art Evening Sale

Evening Sale
13 October 2007, 4pm
London