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  • Provenance

    John Weber Gallery, New York.

  • Catalogue Essay

    Jack Goldstein is often recognised for his early works - a series of short film loops which emphasize performance to its purest form. He has also, however, devoted a large part of his career to painting. He began to concentrate on the medium of painting in the late 1970s, creating works ranging from images of lightning storms to volcano eruptions.

    In the 1980s Goldstein's paintings were associated with appropriation, the post-studio movement, Neo-Pop and eventually Neo-Geo. He focused on creating images of disasters and war with only a few colours and glossy surfaces. This technique and style would aid him in capturing the subject-matter to its fullest and translate through the picture-surface to any spectator viewing the works.

    By the late 1980s, his paintings became a simulation of abstraction, principally derived from the appearance of heat sensors and astronomical phenomena, of "what we can’t see", as Goldstein once said. This Untitled work belongs to this series of paintings which are based on photographic images of natural phenomena, science and technology. Goldstein’s large scale painting with its abstract round shapes and its colours of red, blue and green, orange and black emphasise the abstract aspect of the painting. Its abstracted forms give way for a number of different interpretations of the work – leaving the spectator to decipher the unknown and unrecognisable.

304

Untitled

1988
Acrylic on canvas.
48 x 96 in. (122 x 244 cm).


Estimate
£30,000 - 40,000 

Contemporary Art Evening Sale

Evening Sale
13 October 2007, 4pm
London