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  • Provenance


    Acquired directly from the artist

  • Exhibited


    Washington, D.C., National Museum of Women in the Arts, Natalya Nesterova:
    Summer Reflections, May 20 – August 7, 2005; The Metropolitan Club, 2005 Annual Tretyakov
    Ball, November 28, 2005; New York, Patricia Ewers Center for the Arts, Nostalgic
    Conceptualization, February 10 – March 5, 2006; New York, Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at
    Lincoln Center, 2006 Annual Tretyakov Ball, November 8, 2006
    Washington, D.C., National Museum of Women in the Arts, Natalya Nesterova:
    Summer Reflections, May 20 – August 7, 2005; The Metropolitan Club, 2005 Annual Tretyakov
    Ball, November 28, 2005; New York, Patricia Ewers Center for the Arts, Nostalgic
    Conceptualization, February 10 – March 5, 2006; New York, Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at
    Lincoln Center, 2006 Annual Tretyakov Ball, November 8, 2006

  • Catalogue Essay


    From the moment she appeared on the Soviet art scene, Natalya Nesterova
    was the subject of heightened attention. That in itself was a sign of success
    but of a particular kind of success, linked to the modality for taking charge
    and taking over. Her trademark became motifs of loneliness in a crowd,
    ‘concealing the face,’ masking, hiding. Nesterova has an enviable talent for
    uniting positioning and poetics. What exactly is going on — presence and
    disappearance. Perhaps it should even be hyphenated: presencedisappearance.
    The category of presence is fairly well defined—but what
    about disappearance? How does Nesterova visualize and reify this extremely
    difficult material? Her paintings play the role, as was said in the eighteenth
    century, of ‘symbols and emblems.’ Indeed, endless flashes of the flow of
    time— stopped, found, lost, reversed, discrete—permeate all of Nesterova’s
    work. We note that the flash is only a device for illumination, for lighting up
    the flow of time; for working with it. It has nothing to do with ‘staying the
    moment.’ The moment stayed, the still photo, are individual and rare
    instances of work with the ceremonial flow of time. Usually this work is more
    complex — Nesterova is testing out time with all of the senses; she grasps
    the most complex temporal processes. I think that Nesterova succeeded not
    only in ‘reifying’ but also in ‘embodying,’ — in providing a tactile-corporeal
    emanation, traditional of the Russian avant-garde — the metaphysics of
    white (with regards to Malevich!) This is her trademark whitening,
    whitish, often stretched out to shamelessly huge, nearly three
    dimensional depictions.
    Dr. Alexander Borovsky, Ph.D.

270

Bouquet

2005

Oil on canvas.

36 x 30 in. (91.4 x 76.2 cm).

Signed, titled and dated
“Nesterova 2005 Bouquet” on the reverse.

Estimate
$30,000 - 40,000 

Sold for $37,000

Contemporary Art Part II

16 Nov 2007, 10am & 2pm
New York