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  • Literature

    Alice Rawsthorn, Marc Newson, London, 1999, pp. 38-41;  Conway Lloyd Morgan, Marc Newson, London, 2002, pp. 162-163

  • Catalogue Essay

    The ‘Black Hole’ table was created while Marc Newson was living and working in Tokyo, and quickly became a widely exhibited design throughout Asia and Europe.  As its name indicates, the concept of the design is inspired by natural black holes, areas of space with such a high concentration of mass that nothing in its surrounding region can escape its gravitational pull.  Newson experimented with materials to illustrate, tangibly, the direction and force of the pull creating deep hollows in the table's surface.  The design was executed in carbon fibre, a material quickly gaining prominence among designers at the time of production.  With a lower density than steel, carbon fibre has the highest tensile strength of any reinforced material, and its lightweight structural capabilities made it a perfect choice to achieve the effect of the dipping wells and overall sense of fluidity of the 'Black Hole'.
    "This table was an extension of the 'Sine Chair' idea, and a chance to do something in carbon fibre.  I'd always been fascinated by Black Holes, and loved reading about them in Omni and Scientific American.  It was made by these Japanese surfers I'd met by the seaside in Tokyo for an exhibition organized by Idee" - Rawsthorn, Marc Newson, p. 39.
    The 'Black Hole' table first edition which will be included as 'MN-13CBHT2-2005', in the forthcoming 'catalogue raisonne' of limited limited by Marc Newson, is currently being prepared by Didier Krzentowski of Gallery Kreo, Paris.

135

Important ‘Black Hole’ table

c. 2006
Carbon fibre.
71.8 x 247 x 101 cm (28 1/4 x 97 1/4 x 39 3/4 in.)
Produced by Marc Newson, France.  Number one from an edition of ten, plus two artist's proofs and one prototype.  Underside signed ‘Marc Newson/1 / 10’.

Estimate
£150,000 - 200,000 ≠ ♠ †

Sold for £168,500

Design

24 Apr 2008, 2pm
London