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  • Provenance

    Modern Art, London

  • Catalogue Essay

    The art of projection in this present lot is emblematic of transformative art. Tim Noble and Sue Webster take ordinary things, including rubbish, to make assemblages and then point light to create projected shadows. The shadows show a great likeness to something identifiable including self-portraits. In the instance of the present lot the projected rat approaching a trap is eerily realistic compared to the original sculpture of metal scrap. The process of transformation, from the discarded waste to a recognizable image, echoes the idea of "perceptual psychology" a form of evaluation used for psychological patients. Noble and Webster are familiar with this process and how people evaluate abstract forms. Throughout their careers they have played with the idea of how humans perceive abstract images and define them with a meaning. Rat on a Trap does just this in a concrete way as it take an abstract pile of scrap metal and transforms its meaning through projection. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones. (Taken from www.mediumstbarth.com, November 2007)

631

Rat on a Trap

2006
Welded scrap metal and light projector.
Dimensions variable; sculpture: 106 x 109 x 16.5 cm., light projector: 13.5 x 12 x 17.5 cm.
This work is unique.

Estimate
£80,000 - 120,000 

Contemporary Art Day Sale

30 June 2008, 10am & 2pm
London