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  • Provenance

    Galerie Max Hetzler, Cologne

  • Catalogue Essay

    “It is said that it takes eight years for a sturgeon to mature, eight minutesto remove caviar from its belly and eight seconds to taste it. Shrinkingexponentially, those numbers tell a grotesque tale of economic andenvironmental decadence. Numbers – random, consecutive, wildly escalating– also run across Georg Herold’s ‘caviar paintings’, yet his work refuses toconform to the reductive post-Marxist equations between art and the marketso dear to younger artists. If caviar suggests conspicuous consumption, inHerold’s work it is also the aggregate of a Pop image and the Beuysian aura ofpure material. Herold, after all, is in his mid-60s, old enough to belong to thegeneration that superseded the great German shaman…”
    (Mark Prince, ‘Georg Herold’, Frieze, issue 140, June–August 2011)

    Comparable to the playful, open-ended experimentation of Arte Povera,Herold uses a vast array of materials and concepts which challengethe nature of art and its context effectively while injecting them with amischievous sense of humour. His work is powerful and confrontational,and like other German artists working at the same time, such as MartinKippenberger, Werner Buttner and Albert Oehlen, with whom Herold hasbeen closely associated. In their different ways, these artists’ work defied
    prevailing bourgeois art forms and remained outside the limits of conventionalcategorizations of contemporary art.

126

Untitled

1990
Cavier, acrylic and lacquer on canvas.
320 × 180.3 cm (126 × 71 in).
Signed anddated ‘Herold 90’ on the reverse and on the stretcher.

Estimate
£50,000 - 70,000 ‡ ♠

Contemporary Art Day Sale

13 October 2011
London