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  • Provenance

    Acquired directly from the artist

  • Exhibited

    Paris, Le Monde de l’Art, Vladimir Yankilevsky, 9 September – 31 October, 1992; Washington, D.C., National Jewish Museum, Here and There, Then and Now: Contemporary Artists from the Former Soviet Union, 1996; New York, Museum of the Yeshiva University, Remembrance: Russian Post-Modern Nostalgia, 10 September, 2003 – 2 February, 2004; West Hollywood, Los Angeles, Pacific Design Center, Through the Past to the Future, 16 April – 23 April, 2004

  • Literature

    Vladimir Yankilevsky, Le Monde de l’Art, Paris, 1992, p. 18-19 (illustrated); A. Gertsman, ed., Remembrance: Russian Post-Modern Nostalgia, New York, 2003, pp. 32 & 49

  • Catalogue Essay

    Vladmir Yankilevsky has chosen the path of conceptual-esthetic revolt against Soviet artistic rule. The enigmatic iconography of Yankilevsky’s “Train” series has a surrealist flavor. Ordinary objects are “analyzed” into planar sections, which are then reconstructed into abstract images that seem altogether autonomous. Nothing is stable in these works; indeed, their vertigo and fragmentation suggest the dizzying freedom and uncertain spontaneity of post-Soviet artistic possibilities. D. Kuspit, ‘Identity Formation in the Post-Soviet State’ in Remembrance: Russian Post-Modern Nostalgia, New York, 2003, p.49

176

Take a Train… IV

1992
Oil on canvas mounted on panel, oil on panel, masonite, paper, and a plastic and metal wheel (in five parts).
Overall: 200.6 x 670.5 cm. (79 x 264 in).
Signed ‘Vladmir Yankilevsky [in Cyrillic] 92’ on the reverse of each.

Estimate
£100,000 - 150,000 ‡ ♠

Contemporary Art Evening Sale

28 Feb 2008, 7pm
London