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  • Provenance

    Michael Werner Gallery, Berlin

  • Catalogue Essay

    Born in 1945, Immendorff was of the generation that experienced post-war disillusionment that politicised every waking moment. As a student in the 1960s, he faced the task of examining Germany's tragic history and its fraught relationship with modernity. This forced him to devise a balancing act between eras.
     Immendorff promulgates a watertight tautology that runs progressively through his ideas and delivery and is clearly visible in his painterly execution. His questions about the purpose of art and the conceptualisation of the artist's role are answered by the work itself and indeed, in retrospect, by Immendorff's own life. “The term neo-expressionism is just as misleading as Neue Wilde. We were neither expressionists nor wild young artists. We have to try and get at the philosophy behind the paintings. I am as hungry for the meaning of painting as ever. What does art mean? What is the role of the artist in society? I still want to bring into focus the last two vibrant decades of the twentieth century and all they meant. But that will take time, because, in the end, the life force of art knows nothing of normal time. It makes itself known irregularly, affecting both our understanding of the past and our ability to cope with the future. What we really need is another concept of time in order to grasp the essentials of art.” (J. Immendorff in coversation with P. Kort ‘Jorg Immendorff talks to Pamela Kort - '80s Then – Interview’ in Art Forum, March, 2003)

269

Society of Deficiency

1998
Oil on canvas.
155 x 135 cm. (61 x 53 1/8 in).
Signed and dated ‘Immendorff 98'

Estimate
£80,000 - 120,000 ≠ †

Contemporary Art Evening Sale

29 June 2008, 5pm
London