Create your first list.

A way to share and manage lots.

  • Provenance

    Galerie Crousel-Robelin/Bama, Paris; Skarstedt Gallery, New York

  • Exhibited

    Southampton, The Parrish Art Museum, Face Value: American Portraits, July – September 1995 (another example exhibited); Oostende, Museum voor Moderne Kunst, Rene Magritte and the Contemporary Art, April – June 1998 (another example exhibited); New York, Grey Art Gallery, Inverted Odysseys, Claude Cahun, Maya Deren and Cindy Sherman, November 1999 – January 2000 (another example exhibited); Cindy Sherman: Paris, Jeu de Paume, 16 May – 3 September 2006; Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2 December 2006 – 28 January 2007; Humlebæk, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 9 February – 13 May 2007; Berlin, Martin Gropius Bau, 15 June – 10 September 2007 (another example exhibited)

  • Literature

    A. Danto, Cindy Sherman: History Portraits, Munich, 1990, pl. 33, p. 57 (illustrated); R. Krauss, Cindy Sherman 1975–1993, New York, 1993, p. 170 (illustrated); Museum voor Moderne Kunst, ed., René Magritte and the Contemporary Art, Oostende, 1998, p. 185 (illustrated); S. Kirschbaum, ‘Broad Strokes’, Whitewall, New York (September 2006), p. 84 (illustrated); R. Durand, Cindy Sherman, Paris, 2007, pp. 148 and 257 (illustrated)

  • Catalogue Essay

    Cindy Sherman made her series of photographs known as the History Portraits while she was living in Rome in the late 1980s. She found the atmosphere of Renaissance Rome both a catalyst and suitable cultural setting for this series. Being one of the celebrated photographs from this acclaimed series, the present lot, Untitled #194, is a seminal image in which Sherman captures in a single iconic self-image the principal themes that define the artist’s oeuvre. Through the incorporation and imitation of costumes, poses, interiors and settings that characterize classical portraiture, this series digs deeply into the canon of European art.
     
    “In the History Portraits, created in 1989–90 on the theme of Old Master paintings, Sherman unleashes the full blast of her iconoclastic verve. False noses, false breasts, cheap costume jewelry, everyday fabrics, and thickly plastered makeup are assembled under dazzling, bright light: the joke shop takes its revenge on the museum … the references are precise in some cases, and more fragmented in others … The overall impression is of an unsavory cultural minestrone, floating with bits of Fouquet, Raphael, Rubens, Fragonard, and Ingres … Sherman highlights the creation of a world where formal invention, fantasy and satire reign supreme.”
     
    (J. P. Criqui, ‘The Lady Vanishes’ in Cindy Sherman, Paris, 2006, pp. 279, 281)

  • Artist Biography

    Cindy Sherman

    American • 1954

    Seminal to the Pictures Generation as well as contemporary photography and performance art, Cindy Sherman is a powerhouse art practitioner.  Wily and beguiling, Sherman's signature mode of art making involves transforming herself into a litany of characters, historical and fictional, that cross the lines of gender and culture. She startled contemporary art when, in 1977, she published a series of untitled film stills.

    Through mise-en-scène​ and movie-like make-up and costume, Sherman treats each photograph as a portrait, though never one of herself. She embodies her characters even if only for the image itself. Presenting subversion through mimicry, against tableaus of mass media and image-based messages of pop culture, Sherman takes on both art history and the art world.

    Though a shape-shifter, Sherman has become an art world celebrity in her own right. The subject of solo retrospectives across the world, including a blockbuster showing at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and a frequent exhibitor at the Venice Biennale among other biennials, Sherman holds an inextricable place in contemporary art history.

    View More Works

12

Untitled (#196)

1989
Colour coupler print in the artist's frame.
170 x 112 cm. (67 x 44 in).
This work is from an edition of six.

Estimate
£180,000 - 250,000 

Contemporary Art Evening

12 Feb 2010
London